Richard Strauss, by Matthew Boyden

Großmächtige Prinzessin!
–Zerbinetta

This one is a bit of a mittelbrau work, which gives the reader enough history for some reasonable context and enough of the music to keep track of why Strauss was so important for so long. You won’t find a great deal of harmonic analysis, and the only staff is Richard’s own as he climbs the mountains dreaming of his Alpine Symphony.

The back cover of this edition shows the composer in a friendly handshake with Dr. Goebbels. Strauss accepted the leadership of the Reichsmusikkammer (RMK) apparently without qualms of conscience. His anti-Semitism was not something that he came to late in life (he was nearly seventy in 1933), but was part of his generally comfortable Bavarian way of life, as presented by the author. Still, the biography quotes in full Strauss’s letter to his collaborator Stefan Zweig, in which Strauss wrote, “I pose as President of the Reichsmusikkammer . . . to bring about good and to prevent greater disasters! Simply because I know my artistic duty, I would have taken on this tiresome honorary office under any government . . . . So be good, forget Herr Moses and the other apostles for a couple of weeks, and keep on working at your two one-acters.” The letter was opened by the government, and Strauss had to resign his position in 1935. Yet he kept composing and kept his comfortable villa in Garmisch without much, if any, effort to make life a little easier for those who didn’t have it so easy. When the Americans rolled up in April 1945, he came downstairs to announce, “I am Richard Strauss, composer of Salome and Der Rosenkavalier.” He lost the house for a while during de-Nazification, but avoided trial. An American officer who played in the orchestra back home asked him whether he would ever compose an oboe concerto. Strauss blurted out an abrupt no, but wrote one later, giving the American officer the right to the premiere.

At his funeral, the marcia funebre from Eroica was played, and the Rosenkavalier Trio.

Titian, "Bacchus and Ariadne"

Titian, “Bacchus and Ariadne”

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